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Tecumseh Area Living Magazine

About Us

Established in 2006


Established in 2006 in the offices of The Tecumseh Herald - Homefront began as an exclusive real estate book and quickly morphed into a community lifestyle magazine. Originally mailed exclusively to every home and business in Tecumseh, we now reach far outside the Tecumseh area. The full-color glossy format has become a "must read" and therefore a "must advertise in..." publication.

What We Do


Located 30 miles Southwest of Ann Arbor, we explore and bring to light the rich offerings this corner of Southeast Michigan has to offer. From farm to table recipes, antique offerings, loft renovations, personal stories and exciting events, our seasonal magazine focuses on the charm of small town living.

Spreading the Word


Known for taking immense pride in our work, we feel we succeed when our advertisers do. Our 5 time MPA (Michigan Press Association) Award Winning graphic artists create many successful ad campaigns for local small businesses wishing not to remain small. Our design fee is free and is incorporated in our ad space rates. Businesses using their own agencies are also welcome to spread the word to our avid readers.

Some of our Featured Stories


We like to keep you up-to-date with what's going on right in your own backyard.
Here are some stories from our latest issue of Homefront.

Light

Light

Sara Hilton     Winter 2017 Homefront

Sometimes light falls onto our lives in brilliant and unexpected ways. David Scheff is the story of such light. Some have called David Tecumseh's Goodwill Ambassador, a fitting name for the young man who makes his daily rounds to the downtown merchants. He compliments display changes, says hello to pedestrians, he is wowed by cars and clothes and colors. He waves, and he laughs. There is a lot of laughter when David is around.

"One thing you are known for is your wonderful laugh," I say to David when we first meet. He laughs when I say this, and it is a laugh that is easy and full and it feels as if somehow the air has been charged with happiness. There is a Rilke poem entitled "A Walk" in which the poet describes looking ahead at a sunny hill and how seeing light, even from a distance, impacts who we are. "It changes us," Rilke writes, "into something else, which, hardly sensing it, we already are." That is what Read more

Abstract

Abstract

Sara Hilton     Winter 2017 Homefront

"Take a plain white box, add beautiful earrings, a necklace, and definitely some great pumps." That is how you get a modern farmhouse according to Teena Hill, who owns Abstract Builders with her husband, Rob. Modern farmhouse seems in itself to be a juxtaposition, two words with contrasting effect. Yet perhaps that is the appeal of this popular style—the fresh contemporary lines of who we are today with the warmth of cozy days gone by. It is a style of modern nostalgic comfort.

Brian and Liz Trybus were in the market for nostalgic comfort. Brian grew up in Clinton and Liz grew up in Tecumseh. They moved away for a while, but soon life included small children and busy jobs and they decided to return home to the Tecumseh area to be near family. They chose a home in a Read more

Begin Again

Begin Again

Sara Hilton    Winter 2017 Homefront

It's just a day, just another calendar flip, just another number. Yet January 1 always begs for new goals and promises. Somehow we like that line in the sand that a new year brings—a threshold we can cross to feel as though we've shaken the past off our shoulders and have the chance to begin again and become the person we've really wanted to be all along. January 1 feels like a threshold of second chances, and we humans always seem to need so many of those.

So we make resolutions to be thinner, richer, happier. We resolve to be better. Mandee Warford, owner of Tecumseh's Anytime Fitness, knows about such resolutions and the all-or-nothing fitness promises that so many of us Read more

Black Pig Salame

Black Pig Salame

Sara Hilton    Winter 2017 Homefront

Historians speculate that this item contributed to the power of the Roman Empire, and now Tecumseh is one of only 18 places in the United States where this item is produced. It isn't weaponry, it's fermented dry-cured salami. "Fermenting meat was an awesome scientific discovery," said Erika Aylward owner of The Boulevard Market. "It is a way to preserve meat using bacteria." This scientific discovery changed the way people lived and even fought. Fermented meat meant that Roman soldiers could carry protein rich food, keeping them Read more

The Word on the Street


We love hearing your thoughts on the Homefront so much that we share it with others!