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Tecumseh Area Living Magazine

About Us

Established in 2006


Established in 2006 in the offices of The Tecumseh Herald - Homefront began as an exclusive real estate book and quickly morphed into a community lifestyle magazine. Originally mailed exclusively to every home and business in Tecumseh, we now reach far outside the Tecumseh area. The full-color glossy format has become a "must read" and therefore a "must advertise in..." publication.

What We Do


Located 30 miles Southwest of Ann Arbor, we explore and bring to light the rich offerings this corner of Southeast Michigan has to offer. From farm to table recipes, antique offerings, loft renovations, personal stories and exciting events, our seasonal magazine focuses on the charm of small town living.

Spreading the Word


Known for taking immense pride in our work, we feel we succeed when our advertisers do. Our 5 time MPA (Michigan Press Association) Award Winning graphic artists create many successful ad campaigns for local small businesses wishing not to remain small. Our design fee is free and is incorporated in our ad space rates. Businesses using their own agencies are also welcome to spread the word to our avid readers.

Some of our Featured Stories


We like to keep you up-to-date with what's going on right in your own backyard.
Here are some stories from our latest issue of Homefront.

Coming Home

Coming Home

Sara Hilton     Summer 2017 Homefront

"Bogota is a very old city, about 450 years old. So we have all kinds of styles and beautiful homes. When I was a kid, my dad was always teaching me about history and houses, and I knew that someday I wanted my own old house."

Sandoval moved to the United States at the age of 28 with a degree in Industrial Design. "I am the only one in my family who is in the United States. You could say I was the black sheep—the one with the weird ideas and dreams, the creative one. My siblings say they could have never done what I did—moving to another country without knowing the language, without knowing a lot of things. It took a lot of guts, and when I look back at what I did I think, how did I do that? I'm not sure I'd have the guts to do it again. But I had nothing to lose. That's what you do when you have nothing to lose and everything to gain. I mean, what are you going to lose if you have nothing to lose?" Read more

Picturing Tecuseh's Past

Picturing Tecuseh's Past

Mary Kay McPartlin    Summer 2017 Homefront

As a student Ashley Chase wasn't much interested in the history taught in school. Being the publisher of a book highlighting local history was not a dream for his future. Yet, his adulthood contact with the history of Tecumseh found in real, tangible items like photos and collectibles made the subject fascinating to Ashley, and led to this year's publication of "Tecumseh – Images of the Past."

His personal study of banks in Lenawee County and obsolete currency brought Ashley in contact with photos and postcards of Tecumseh, and he created a personal collection of approximately 1,400 photos and 500 postcards. These photos show Tecumseh as almost a foreign place with buildings and people from a time Read more

Strength to Spare

Strength to Spare

Sara Hilton    Summer 2017 Homefront

Legend has it that conquistador Juan Ponce de Leon was searching for the elusive fountain of youth when he inadvertently stumbled into Florida. That's how it goes at times. Sometimes we never find what we set out to discover. Sometimes we find something even better.

That's how it was when I walked into Tecumseh's Ten Pin Alley to interview a group of women for a story on bowling. Sometimes you chase a story and end up stumbling into something much more solid and real.

When I first arrived, I watched 93-year-old Cora walk up to the lane and throw a curve ball. "She's our best bowler," her teammates tell me. When she's finished Read more

Those Who Came Before

Those Who Came Before

Sara Hilton    Summer 2017 Homefront

"We need to start at the beginning," says Dan Righter, the superintendent of Tecumseh's Brookside cemetery, as we climb into his truck. It seems he feels I need to understand what came before Brookside Cemetery before I can really understand. He drives me to Elliot Park near downtown Tecumseh and explains that the park used to be the original cemetery. As Tecumseh grew in size, it became clear that a new cemetery location would be needed. Land was purchased off Union Street and became Brookside. It took ten years to move the 282 bodies from the original cemetery to the new cemetery. I scratch the flat numbers into my notes: 282 bodies... ten years... but then Righter continues... "It was different back then," he explains "Anything that needed to get done was done by hand. They would dig Read more

The Word on the Street


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